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Do you want more sleep?   Yes! I need more sleep.

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  1. Megan Zaragoza says:

    I need advice we have family
    2 elderly people
    One infant
    30 year old
    What’s the best temperature
    I told my grandparents 64 but they say it’s too cold for them how can I get it to the point as an agreement
    My baby sleeps with onies
    I sleep with shorts and tank top
    I have thermometer in my room
    I like to keep it around 61
    Me my baby cosleep so we bounce heat off of each other

    • Janelle Reid says:

      Hi @Megan Zaragoza, thanks for writing to us. I’m sorry your household is not in agreement over the temperature. I would just suggest finding a compromise to help everyone be comfortable, which may be meeting in the middle, or that some people get floor fans or heaters, depending on the situation. Good luck, I hope you find a happy medium with everyone!

  2. David says:

    Does the body temperature of a baby increase when falling asleep on the chest of a woman and if it does or doesn’t does it cause the baby to sweat thank you

    • Debbye @ The Baby Sleep Site says:

      Hi @David – Thank you for writing! If baby is sleeping on a caregiver’s chest, yes, the body heat from the both of them may cause parent or baby to get warmer and to sweat a little! This would depend on the temperature in the air, as well as clothing being worn too. : )

  3. Lori says:

    We have a thermometer in our 8-month-old’s room and try to keep the temp at 69 or 70. However, the temperature changes drastically at night, and we’re afraid to go in and check because he is such a light sleeper. Just the click of the door opening will wake him sometimes. Thanks for all of the experiences.

    Karin, I love the idea of a remote thermometer! Where did you get it?

  4. Rebecca says:

    I was just wondering, at what age to you stop adding that extra layer to keep them warm and have them wear just the same clothes as us?

    My daughter is 15months old and her room is warmer than ours, (in summer it’s a horrible 28 degrees celcius at night in there) which makes it hard for me to be sure she’s not too hot without actually being in the room myself. I don’t want to give her that extra layer, as I’ve read many times, in case it’s too hot… I also read that too much heat induces bad dreams and I REALLY don’t want to do that lol.

    • Nicole says:

      @Rebecca I can attest to when my son is too warm, he seems to have more nightmares, too. We kept an extra layer on our son until he was in a regular bed and when he started keeping (most of) the covers on most of the night. Our younger son is still in extra layers because he doesn’t keep a blanket on, yet, and he’ll be 2 in February. Hope this helps!

  5. Lainie says:

    That’s all helpful to read. I got a space heater, but I’m too paranoid to let it run while she’s asleep. So I run it before, then turn it off. I think it has helped. The spot where she sleeps was about 60 degrees. Brrrr.

  6. Karin says:

    I bought a remote thermometer to monitor the temperature…the thermometer stays in her room and digital readout piece is in our room. It gives me piece of mind because I was worrying about the same thing. Her room is chillier than the rest of the house, but luckily we have a space heater in there, which we keep at about about 67-68 degrees…that seems to be best for her. I feel like the few nights it got hotter than that, she didn’t sleep as well, so I’m happy to hear the same from the rest of you. We dress her in PJs (weight depending upon temp) and then use a fleece sleep sack, which is great.

  7. Joyce says:

    My son’s room is colder than ours, even though the thermostat says 70 it feels much colder than that. We started using a space heater in his room at night, and he is now sleeping better. In fact at almost 11 months, he’s finally sleeping through the night! Now I wonder if he’s been waking up because it was too cold?! He’s little hands are now warm. 🙂

  8. Nicole says:

    @Donna Thank you for sharing your experience.

    @Lainie Yes, I would think they would wake up if they are too cold just the same as if they were too hot. If you’re comfortable, it’s harder to sleep. You might try one more layer on her, but I’m not sure what she’s wearing now. They say to put one more layer on them than you have on.

  9. Lainie Rusco says:

    Our thermostat is at about 68, but where she sleeps is freezing. Do they wake up if they’re too cold, too? I’m afraid to bundle her up too much because I don’t want her to get too warm. But when she wakes up in the middle of the night (presumably to eat, but maybe cause of the temperature) her little hands and lower arms are cold, and sometimes her feet are too. Should I put more clothes on her?

  10. Donna says:

    We too keep the thermostat at 68 degrees. My husband was concerned about the proper temperature when our daughter was a baby and asked her doctor. He said not below 68 degrees overnight. Now that she is in a big girl bed we have adjusted her winter pajamas to include fleece and/or socks on the coldest of nights and regular cotton on the warmer nights.

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