Sleep Training Boot Camp, Part Two: Making Feeding & Schedule Changes (Plus An Optional Bonus Step!)

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New to Sleep Training Bootcamp? Check out our overview page to find out what Sleep Training Boot Camp is all about, and to catch up on past Boot Camp articles.

BOOT CAMP, PART TWO: Making Feeding and Schedule Changes (Plus an Optional Bonus Step)

 
How Small Changes Can Make A Big Sleep Difference

A few days ago, we talked about how important it is to prepare before sleep training. Today’s boot camp article offers another preparation tip – now that you have (hopefully!) done the 5 things you need to do before sleep training, the next step is to take a long, hard look at your baby or toddler’s current feeding and sleep schedule.

Why? Simple – because in our years of working with families, we have found that sometimes, making adjustments to feeding, and to the sleep schedule, makes a big impact on sleep. In fact, some parents have discovered that simply adding in one or two extra daytime feedings, or shifting the timing of naps, eliminates their need to sleep train at all!

We’re not promising that will be true for you, of course, but at the very least, if you have a schedule issue or feeding problem, making the change now will allow a few days for your baby or toddler to adjust before you start sleep coaching, which is a good thing.

So, let’s take these two things separately…

FEEDING

Take a good look at how much your baby or toddler is eating, and then compare that to the recommended averages found on our baby feeding chart. If your little one isn’t taking in enough breastmilk, formula, and/or solid food, then up the amounts.

Also, think about when your baby or toddler is eating. Is there a loooooong stretch between your toddler’s last meal of the day and bedtime? Maybe offer a bedtime snack. Or try cluster-feeding your baby close to bedtime – offer a series of shorter, smaller feeds before bed. Has your baby gotten into a pattern of eating frequently at night and not much during the day? See if you can begin to gradually shift some of those feeds to daylight hours.

SLEEP SCHEDULE

The timing of your child’s naps is what matters here, as well as the morning wake time and bed time. Remember, bedtime shouldn’t be too late, as that can make sleep problems even worse. See our (printable!) baby and toddler bedtime by age chart for help with this. Keep an eye on morning wake time, too – as best you can, try not to get your baby up for the day before about 6 or maybe 6:30 a.m.

Naps are key, too – particularly naps that happen late in the day. If your baby’s last “nap” of the day isn’t over until 6:30 p.m., that’s a problem! It’s going to push bedtime way too late. Watch the length of your baby or toddler’s naps, too – while the last nap of the day can be a short, 30 minute catnap at certain stages (and when you’re nearing a nap transition), a truly restorative nap should be about an hour or longer. (Of course, if short and inconsistent naps are part of the reason why you’re sleep coaching, then don’t stress over this too much; make whatever small changes you can, but know that we’ll get into real nap training in another week or so).

Work on making small changes to the feeding and sleep schedule now, and over the weekend. That will set you up for Boot Camp Part #3, when we’ll make (and implement!) our sleep coaching plans. As you work on this step, some resources that will no doubt really help you are our sample sleep and feeding schedules by age. Use the sample schedule for your child’s age as a template.

bss_ebook_masteringnaps_leftOr, even better, consider picking up a copy of Mastering Naps and Schedules – it has over 45 sample schedules by age, so you will have plenty of scheduling resources to draw from. And don’t forget that right now, Mastering Naps & Schedules is 15% off – so grab a discounted copy today, and get to work on making those feeding and scheduling changes this weekend!
 
 
Of course, at any point, if you feel like you need additional help with anything here (whether that’s the kind of additional do-it-yourself resources you’ll find in our e-Books, or personalized help that comes with a one-on-one sleep consultation), you can visit our Boot Camp Essentials page and grab your boot camp essentials at a 15% discount. Remember, you don’t have to do this alone – we are here to help you conquer sleep training boot camp!

BONUS PART 2: Fill out the Family History Form

You don’t necessarily have to do this part, if you don’t have time, but we think it’ll be really helpful in planning for sleep coaching.

Now, I know what you may be thinking – “What on earth is a Family History Form??” Great question! ;) The Family History Form is a form that we ask all our consultation clients to fill out prior to starting their consultations. It allows us to get all the background information before our consultants create the Personalized Sleep Plans™ for each family.

BUT, filling out the Family History Form isn’t just for our consultation clients – it’s an exercise that can benefit ANY family who’s struggling with sleep. We have heard from lots of readers over the years who have told us that filling out the form helped them so much in the sleep coaching process.

Why? Because the form helps you:

  • …identify your baby or toddler’s specific sleep associations.
  • …summarize the history of your baby or toddler’s sleep issues (when they started, how long they have lasted, if/when they got worse, etc.)
  • …outline what sleep training (if any) you have tried already. It’s key to use your past sleep training experience when creating your sleep training plan (more on that soon), so this step of the form is a vital one.
  • …summarize your child’s current sleep and feeding schedule.
  • …identify your child’s feeding habits and schedule considerations.
  • …pin down your baby or toddler’s temperament.
  • …summarize your own parenting philosophy (which will have a big impact on the kind of sleep coaching methods you include in your sleep plan).
  • …identify your sleep coaching expectations.

Many parents have told us that filling out the form is therapeutic. Some have even told us that, by filling out the form, they were able to clearly see and understand their sleep situation for the first time – there’s just something about putting the facts (and your feelings!) down on paper.

Here’s what Vikki, your “boot camp encourager”, had to say about what filling out the Family History Form was like for her:

BSS Headshot 2“Filling out the form put a voice to our problems. I made lots of notes on Lyla’s sleep and issues around sleep on my own, but filling out the form made it a narrative. It gave me a comprehensive story to look at and problem solve. It also forced me to think through things that I thought were little or insignificant and how they might be impacting Lyla’s ability to self sooth and learn to sleep on her own. It was an excellent exercise and I highly recommend it for anyone struggling with sleep issues with their little one.”

And here’s something else to consider – even if you don’t plan to do a personalized consultation with a Baby Sleep Site consultant now, if you change your mind in the next few weeks, you’ll have your Family History Form all filled out and ready to go. Win! :)

So, if you have time this weekend, after working on implementing feeding and schedule changes – sit down and take a little time to fill out the Family History Form. Then, save it – you’ll need the info in it to tackle boot camp part #3!

Download a PDF copy of the Family History Form HERE. Or, click this link to automatically download a Word version of the form – great if you want to type your info right into the field provided.

Don’t forget that, while you can definitely tackle sleep training boot camp all by yourself, you don’t have to. If you’d like your own personal (but friendly!) drill sergeant, to guide you through this process, we can help with that! We also have a variety of e-Books designed to give you even more resources to help you along in your boot camp journey. And the best part – our e-Books and our consultations are currently 15% off!! So be sure to stop by and pick up your boot camp essentials today.

LOTS to do this weekend! Have any feeding or schedule questions? Ask away, and we’ll answer! Have tips for our readers about feeding and schedule changes, or about the Family History Form? Share them – we love hearing from you!

 
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<--Boot Camp Part One: 5 Things To Do Before You Sleep Train

Boot Camp Part Three: Creating & Implementing Your Sleep Training Plan –>

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3 Responses to Sleep Training Boot Camp, Part Two: Making Feeding & Schedule Changes (Plus An Optional Bonus Step!)

  1. Joanna says:

    Hi! Boot Camp…what a great idea! We are in round two of sleep training – the first round was at 5.5 months and it was a great success. Now with round two, we are coming out of a sleep regression and need to get back to better sleep. We are in an awful cycle of overtiredness – short naps and early wake ups are leading to short naps and early wake ups. I’ve got a schedule question. My 22 month old has been waking early in the morning for 8 weeks (445 to 515am). I’ve been compensating by offering an early bedtime. My scheduling qestion is – what time should I nap him when he wakes that early? (He’s exhausted by 9am and am scared to push him past 6 hours, but I don’t want to push his awake time before bed past 6 hours either. The math isn’t on our side here…) Thank you for your help!

  2. Emily DeJeu says:

    @ Joanna – glad you’re digging Sleep Training Boot Camp! Re: your schedule question – yes, this is tricky. You could try bumping up the time of the afternoon nap so that it’s a bit earlier than usual (would work with the earlier bedtime), too. Maybe do an earlier-than-usual lunch followed by a nap, and then (hopefully!) the nap will be long, allowing him to catch up on some missed sleep.

    Hope that’s helpful, Joanna! Thanks for commenting. :)

  3. Sarah says:

    Hello boot camp..writing this at 1115 pm when my 15 month old and I are the last ones awake in the house. Hr still nurses to sleep St night and through out the night whenever he wants. I finally got rid of a nap time nursing by strolling him to sleep the laying him in his crib…I know, new association…but I was desperate to dropthat nursing. My question is…is should I wean first even if it means introducing other sleep associations? Or should I sleep train and wean all at the same time. I’m ready to wean…the only reason I’m still nursing is BC it is the only way I get any sleep